Too Small to Fail aims to help parents and businesses take meaningful actions to improve the health and well-being of children ages zero to five, so that more of America’s children are prepared to succeed in the 21st century.

We are working to promote new research on the science of children’s brain development, early learning and early health, and we will help parents, businesses and communities identify specific actions, consistent with the new research, that they can take to improve the lives of young children. As we do this work and secure commitments to action, we will use social media, other technology-driven tools and innovative approaches to inform and empower parents and business leaders to track their progress and measure their success.

Our next generation truly is Too Small to Fail—every child deserves the best possible chance at success. Early childhood experiences have a deep impact on the rest of a child’s life, and America’s future economic prosperity will ultimately be determined by the success of today’s children. Too Small to Fail is about parents, caregivers, other concerned individuals, and the private sector coming together to take small, research-based actions with big impacts. We hope you will join us in helping prepare America’s children to succeed in the 21st century.

The Team

Patti Miller

Patti Miller, Director, Too Small to Fail

Patti Miller is the director of Too Small to Fail for the Clinton Foundation. Too Small to Fail is a joint initiative of the Clinton Foundation and The Opportunity Institute to help parents and businesses take meaningful actions to improve the health and well-being of America’s youngest children, ages zero to five, and prepare them to succeed in the 21st century.

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Kara Dukakis

Kara Dukakis, Director, Too Small to Fail

Kara Dukakis is the director of Too Small to Fail for The Opportunity Institute. Too Small to Fail is a joint initiative of the Clinton Foundation and The Opportunity Institute to help parents and businesses take meaningful actions to improve the health and well-being of America’s youngest children, ages zero to five, and prepare them to succeed in the 21st century.

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