Category: Newsletter

First Teachers Can Be Most Important Teachers

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

First Teachers

Even if parents don’t see themselves as teachers, they are their children’s first—and often, most!—important teachers. From even before birth, babies learn to recognize the sound of their mother’s voices and learn about their environment. And after birth, babies look to parents to help them make sense of the world around them, from new foods to new experiences. Every book that is read, song that is sung, or story that is told is an opportunity for parents to teach their young children about their environment, boost their vocabulary and build closer bonds.

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Nurturing a Kinder, Gentler Child With Empathy

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

Sometimes, very young children can be highly attuned to the emotional state of others—crying when they see a parent or sibling cry, for example. Other times, they can appear insensitive, ignoring a child’s cries or pointing out differences that make adults wince.  The ability to relate to how others feel, or empathy, is learned in different ways throughout a person’s life and while not always readily apparent in babies or toddlers, it is an important skill to learn that contributes to success in school and beyond.

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All We Need Is A Little Love (Mostly)

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

Father kissing son

A cuddle. A warm smile. Softly spoken words. All of these things help babies feel comfortable and secure, and help them learn that they can trust the adults around them. The more safe and secure babies and young children feel, the more easily they form healthy relationships with others, and can turn their attention to learning.

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Sensory Play Encourages Thinking—and Fun!

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

Sensory play encourages thinking--and fun!

Have you noticed how babies try to put everything in their mouths, no matter the yuck factor? It is one of the many reasons we must remain vigilant around young children, but it’s also a fascinating peek inside their active brains. By using their senses—sight, touch, hearing, smell and taste—young children explore and learn about their world. And this curiosity offers a great opportunity for parents and caregivers to help their children learn.

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Developing Young Readers

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

How to develop a young reader

Have you ever noticed how some children (and adults!) can get so absorbed in a book that the rest of the world seems to disappear around them? A love for reading can be both fun and educational, and it can start early in a child’s life.

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Family Routines Make Starting School Easier

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

Parents of young children know that life is anything but routine with their little ones around. Things can be even more chaotic when kindergarten, preschool or daycare is thrown in the mix—it can be tough to plan for school schedules while balancing family life.

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Making Active Play Happen Every Day

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

When it comes to brain-building activities, nothing comes more naturally to babies and toddlers than play. Active play, or play that gets kids moving, is important for the healthy development of motor skills, muscles, and coordination. A baby is actively playing when she stretches her tiny arms to reach for an object or starts to crawl. For a toddler, it can be bouncing to the beat of a song you sing, running down the sidewalk, or climbing stairs.

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How Art Encourages Creativity (And Other Development, Too)

Too Small to Fail
By Too Small to Fail

If you’ve ever seen the look of delight or wonder that comes over a young child’s face when they first use a crayon to draw, then you’ve witnessed the effect that art can have on a child’s development. Art engages children on many different levels as it supports eye-hand coordination, creativity, and visual learning, among other developmental skills. And children often enjoy making art, even if it’s only for a few minutes at a time and using inexpensive items, like recycled food containers or homemade materials. By encouraging young children to engage in artistic activities, parents and caregivers can help their children’s brain development and provide a good source of stress relief, too.

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