Category: Newsletter

Good Food for Thought

By Too Small to Fail

Good Food for Thought

Nutritious food is important to the normal development of very young children. From brain growth to physical strength, healthy food provides the fuel that babies and toddlers need to thrive. But offering healthful food to young children doesn’t have to be stressful for parents and caregivers. There are many ways that parents can help their children enjoy healthy eating—even among picky eaters!

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Appreciation for Math Starts at Home!

By Too Small to Fail

Appreciation for Math Starts at Home!

Young children often show a thirst for knowledge that helps their brains develop. This thirst presents a good opportunity for parents to encourage an early appreciation for math, which improves brain growth, and serves as a foundation for math skills learned later in school. And the really good news is that early math learning can be fun for both parents and children!

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Even Singing Off Key Can Bring a Smile to Children’s Faces

By Too Small to Fail

Even Singing Off Key Can Bring a Smile to Children’s Faces

If YouTube videos are any indication, most babies love music and singing. From a very early age, children enjoy hearing silly songs, soothing lullabies and even fun rock songs if those songs are sung by their favorite people—parents and caregivers! New brain research continues to confirm the importance of singing to children, and is revealing how even the simplest melodies can contribute to early brain development.

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Reading Aloud With Children For Learning and Fun

By Too Small to Fail

Reading Aloud With Children For Learning and Fun

“You’re never too old, too wacky, too wild, to pick up a book and read to a child.” Dr. Seuss

Reading aloud to children has many benefits for both parents and children. Books that rhyme can be especially fun to read aloud, and help children better understand the natural rhythm and sounds of language. Perhaps few children’s books have been as loved by both parents and children as those written by Dr. Seuss. His books—from Fox in Socks to Green Eggs and Ham—are meant to be read aloud, and parents and children of all ages delight in them. 

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Early Communication Builds Language and Social Skills

By Too Small to Fail

Early Communication Builds Language and Social Skills

Human beings use many forms of communication to share thoughts, feelings and ideas with others. Language is a skill that is learned from birth by the back-and-forth dialogue that parents and other caregivers develop with their babies and toddlers. However, babies and toddlers communicate in a variety of ways before they are able to speak—including through coos, babbling, physical touch and even crying. The more parents and caregivers encourage early communication, the more their young children learn about how to express themselves.

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Empathy and Kindness Go Hand in Hand

By Too Small to Fail

Empathy and Kindness Go Hand in Hand

When asked, many parents say that they value kindness in their children above many other traits. We instinctively know that social skills like gentleness, kindness, and sharing, are important to the long-term health and well-being of our children. But these social and emotional skills are also linked to empathy, or the ability of a person to understand what another person is experiencing. Without empathy, it is difficult for a person to understand and express many of the feelings that help them get along with others.

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How Bonding Builds Babies’ Brains

By Too Small to Fail

How Bonding Builds Babies’ Brains

Often, there is a lot of emphasis placed on the cognitive or physical skills young children pick up—how to roll over, walk, or recite a nursery rhyme, for example. But in truth, social and emotional skills are just as important to early brain development, and for reasons that scientists are just beginning to understand. And this type of early social-emotional development has a direct connection to how parents and caregivers interact with their children early on. 

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Celebrating Black History and Diversity Builds Self-Esteem and Empathy

By Too Small to Fail

Celebrating Black History and Diversity Builds Self-Esteem and Empathy

Every February, teachers across America highlight the important contributions that African Americans have made to United States history, culture, and economy. Integral to these conversations is the importance of diversity, and teaching children to appreciate the differences—and commonalities—among their fellow human beings. But children can begin learning about diversity and celebrating African American history before they begin school. In fact, parents and caregivers can help children understand early on that appreciating the differences among us enriches all our lives.

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Encouraging Curiosity for Better Learning

By Too Small to Fail

Encouraging Curiosity for Better Learning

When children exhibit curiosity, they are actually exhibiting an interest in learning. This innate interest in learning and exploring their world helps children retain information, and is an asset to their later development and success in school. The more curious children are about the things they see, hear and think—and the more questions they ask!—the better off they are in later learning.

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Active Play is Good For Everyone!

By Too Small to Fail

Active Play is Good For Everyone!

Ever notice how some young children appear capable of generating enough energy through their movements to power a large city block for a day? Whether by running in circles, swinging their arms or jumping up and down in place for a long stretch of time, many babies and toddlers enjoy levels of physical activity that exhaust all but the most physically fit adults.

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